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Information for Students about the H1N1 (Swine) & Seasonal Flu

Flu Information for Students

SUNY Downstate is closely monitoring information and guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the New York State Department of Health and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene about H1N1 Influenza (Swine Flu) in our region.

We urge you to remain aware of advisories, and to take everyday actions to stay healthy.

This web site is specifically designed to provide information on SUNY Downstate's response as it relates to students in The College of Medicine, College of Nursing, College of Health Related Professions, School of Public Health, and School of Graduate Studies. For information about SUNY Downstate's response as it relates to employees, University Hospital of Brooklyn, or the Community, see the H1N1 (Swine) Flu Information page on the main SUNY Downstate web site:

Current Vaccination Program Status (as of 12/10/09):

Vaccine Status Categories who may be Vaccinated
H1N1 Flu Vaccine IN STOCK

When available:

All Students Enrolled the Colleges of Medicine, Nursing or Health Related Professions & All Students Living in SUNY Downstate Residence Halls (irrespective of college or visitor status)

Seasonal Flu Vaccine IN STOCK

When available:

All Students Enrolled the Colleges of Medicine, Nursing or Health Related Professions & All Students Living in SUNY Downstate Residence Halls (irrespective of college or visitor status)

For more information on where you can obtain Seasonal Flu vaccine or an H1N1 flu vaccine visit the New York City Department of Health's web site at http://www.nyc.gov/flu

This information is accurate as of 12/14/09.

What do I need to know?

Since the start of the fall semester, SUNY Downstate has continued to monitor Influenza-like-illness activity on a daily basis and we want to reassure you that we have developed plans to both help prevent the spread of the H1N1 (Swine) and Seasonal Flu, but also to respond to any outbreak that may occur in the SUNY Downstate community or in the community at large.

Seasonal flu shots for students are now available in Student and Employee Health Services. Students can go to Student and Employee Health to obtain these shots if they wish. Please be sure to bring your SUNY Downstate Student ID card with you and present it to be eligible for the shot. We anticipate receiving the H1N1 flu vaccine shortly and once it is received, SUNY Downstate will implement a mass vaccination program for all faculty, staff, and students. Further information about this program will be made available here when it is available.

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Do I have the flu?

The Centers for Disease Control has developed a web site at http://www.flu.gov to provide important information about both the Seasonal and H1N1 Flu. If you think you have flu-like symptoms, click here to use their Self Evaluation tool. (Please note that this link to the CDC H1N1 Flu Self-Evaluation is provided for informational purposes only to help you understand the flu symptoms you or a family member may be having so that you can make your own health decisions and is only for individuals ages 18 and above. It should not be used as a substitute for evaluation and treatment by a health care professional. This self-assessment information does not capture identifiable information in any manner.)

Flu Self Evaluation

If the self-evaluation tool indicates that it is likely that you have the flu, you should follow the steps listed below AND send an e-mail to Student & Employee Health Services at studenthealth@downstate.edu to report that you have flu-like symptoms. Student & Employee Health Services is monitoring the number of cases of flu in the SUNY Downstate community. Students in clinical rotations also need to notify their clinical faculty and clinical supervisors per the policies of your program or college.

As a SUNY Downstate student, you can obtain the advice of Student & Employee Health Services either over the phone or by making an appointment, or you can consult your own private physician. (This is in addition to sending the e-mail as indicated above.)

To limit the spread of germs when you have flu-like symptoms, the Centers for Disease Control recommends that you:

  • Separate (isolate) yourself from others as best as possible for the duration of your flu symptoms. After at least 24 hours that you are free of fever (100° F [37.8°C]), or signs of a fever (i.e.: chills, sweats) without the use of fever-reducing medications, you may resume your classroom or clinical activities
  • Monitor your temperature every 4-6 hours (this will help determine when you meet the fever free period of 24 hours so you can discontinue self isolation);
  • Seek medical assistance immediately (i.e. Student & Employee Health Services or your personal physician) if you are in a high-risk category, including pregnant women and those with respiratory disease (asthma, COPD), heart disease, diabetes, renal disease, morbid obesity or who have compromised immune systems. Students who develop a respiratory illness with a fever and are in one of these high risk groups for severe complications from H1N1 should contact Student & Employee Health or your personal physician to schedule an appointment.

The Centers for Disease Control recommends that if you have any of the following symptoms that you seek emergency and immediate medical attention:

In adults, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
  • Sudden dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Severe or persistent vomiting
  • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

In children, emergency warning signs that need urgent medical attention include:

  • Fast breathing or trouble breathing
  • Bluish or gray skin color
  • Not drinking enough fluids
  • Severe or persistent vomiting
  • Not waking up or not interacting
  • Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held
  • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough

If you have the above symptoms, you should seek emergency medical treatment or proceed to the nearest emergency room.

Please be sure to follow the instructions on documenting absences as listed below.

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What can I do to stay healthy and prevent the flu?

Influenza is thought to spread mainly person-to-person through coughing or sneezing of infected people.

Remember the 3-C's

  1. Clean.
    Wash your hands often. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand cleaner. Wash your hands after contact with respiratory secretions.
  2. Cover.
    Cover your cough. Use a tissue to cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze. Do not have a tissue - The crook of your elbow will do.
  3. Contain.
    Contain germs by steering clear of others who are sick. Distance yourself from others (more than 3 feet). If you do get sick, stay at home until you're well again, so you do not spread more germs.

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What documentation is required if I am sick and absent from class or clinical courses?

At this time, all documentation requirements regarding medical absences remain in effect. Students should follow the procedures in the Student Handbook and instructions from their individual course or clinical faculty member regarding absence from class. If you are involved in a clinical experience, you should also be in touch with your clinical site and know their instructions on reporting an absence or illness.

In addition to notifying your course or clinical faculty member, if you believe you have an Influenza-like-illness, you should also contact Student Health by telephoning (718) 270-1995 or sending an e-mail to studenthealth@downstate.edu as we will be monitoring the number of cases which may be on campus.

Please note: In the event of a significant outbreak, these instructions may change.

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Does Downstate have a supply of the Vaccine for H1N1 and the Seasonal Flu in stock?

The following memo was issued on November 9, 2009 by Student & Employee Health Services, Downstate Medical Center: See the chart near the top of the page (or click here)

We received an extremely limited supply of H1N1 vaccine this week. As a result, we are distributing vaccinations to students and staff, following the CDC guidelines while the vaccine is in short supply.

Students who fall within the following categories may go to Student and Employee Health Services to receive an H1N1 flu vaccine on a first come, first served basis:

  • All Pregnant Women
  • People with underlying medical conditions that put them at high risk for complications of flu (e.g. diabetes; heart, lung disease, or kidney disease; immunodeficient states)
  • Healthcare workers or students who are rotating or participating in a clinical experience in the following units during November and December 2009 *ONLY* : Emergency Room, Intensive Care Unit, OB, Pediatrics, or Infectious Diseases.

Students may be asked to provide proof they fit into one of these categories. Also, please remember to bring your student ID card with you when you come over to Student & Employee Health to obtain a vaccine.

We are hopeful that additional doses of the vaccine will become available in the coming weeks. When they do, we will continue to notify you about the availability of the vaccine.

For more information, please go to the Downstate Student Flu Information Web Site at: http://sls.downstate.edu/student_affairs/flu.html or to the NYC Department of Health Flu Web Site at http://www.nyc.gov/flu .

Please remember to obtain and keep proof you have received a flu vaccination and keep it for your records.

 

Is it true Governor Paterson has suspended the requirement that Health Professionals be vaccinated?

The following memo was issued on October 23, 2009 by Dr. Michael Lucchesi, Chief Medical Officer of Downstate Medical Center:

Please see below a press release from Governor Paterson, announcing that the requirement for mandatory flu vaccination for healthcare workers is suspended, due to limited vaccine supplies.

In accordance with this directive, Downstate employees at this time will not be required to get vaccinated for seasonal or H1N1 flu.

We continue to strongly encourage employees and students to get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families, and our patients. We anticipate strong demands on our ED and patient units due to regular seasonal flu and H1N1. Getting a flu shot is the best way to protect against getting the flu.

You can continue to get seasonal flu shots at the Employee and Student Health Service, and, when we receive our supply, H1N1 vaccinations. We will be holding our annual "Flu Fair" and will keep you informed when that is scheduled.

Note: Although Governor David Paterson has temporarily suspended the mandatory vaccination program for New York State, we continue to strongly encourage employees and students to get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families, and our patients. Also note that some clinical sites may still require that you be vaccinated for either the seasonal flu, H1N1 (Swine) Flu, or both. If the site requires you to be vaccinated, you must be vaccinated prior to that clerkship beginning.

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STATE OF NEW YORK - EXECUTIVE CHAMBER
DAVID A. PATERSON, GOVERNOR

GOVERNOR DAVID A. PATERSON ANNOUNCES SUSPENSION OF FLU SHOT MANDATE FOR HEALTH CARE EMPLOYEES DUE TO SHORTAGE OF VACCINE

Urges Vaccination for Pregnant Women, Children First

For Immediate Release - October 22, 2009

Governor David A. Paterson today announced that State Health Commissioner Richard F. Daines, M.D., has suspended the mandatory influenza immunization requirement for New York health care workers so that the limited vaccine supplies can be used for populations most at risk of serious illness and death – especially pregnant women and children and young people between the ages of 6 months and 24 years.

"Over the last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) acknowledged that New York would only receive approximately 23 percent of its anticipated vaccine supply by the end of the month,” Governor Paterson said. “As a result, we need to be as resourceful as we can with the limited supplies of vaccine currently coming into the State and make sure that those who are at the highest risk for complications from the H1N1 flu receive the first vaccine being distributed right now in New York State.”

In July and August, the federal government gave states vaccination planning scenarios projecting that 120 million doses of H1N1 vaccine would be available nationwide by the end of October. This week the CDC acknowledged that only about 27.7 million doses of vaccine would be available by the end of the month – just 23 percent of the original projection. Similarly, the CDC originally projected 200 million doses of H1N1 vaccine would be available by the end of November; the CDC’s now projects 65.9 million doses will be available nationwide by the end of that month. New York State receives 6 percent to 7 percent of the national vaccine supply, based on population.

“We had told hospitals that if they had to choose between vaccinating patients or employees to vaccinate patients first,” Commissioner Daines said. “This week, the CDC confirmed that most of the national supply of seasonal flu vaccine has been distributed, and that H1N1 vaccine distribution is far behind projections. New evidence is showing that H1N1 can be especially virulent to pregnant women and young people – so they should get vaccinated first.”

Demand for the H1N1 influenza vaccine by New York’s health care providers has far exceeded supply. The State Health Department opened a call-in center this week for doctors to place orders of H1N1 vaccine for their patients. So far this week, the CDC has allowed the State to enter actual orders for 146,300 doses of vaccine – while New York’s providers have requested more than 1,482,822 doses.

The CDC also recently reported that, due to increased demand this year for seasonal flu vaccine, many providers do not currently have enough of that vaccine to immunize their patients.

“We are pleased that so many people are seeking to be vaccinated against seasonal and H1N1 flu,” Governor Paterson said. “Although the H1N1 vaccine supply is coming in far more slowly than expected, we urge people most at risk of serious complications from the flu to keep in touch with their health care provider so that they can get vaccinated as soon as vaccine is available.”

“The vaccination of health care workers continues to be an important patient safety measure, and I urge hospitals and other health care facilities to encourage employees to be vaccinated against the flu and to schedule flu clinics for that purpose when enough seasonal and H1N1 vaccine becomes available,” Commissioner Daines said.

Citing the authority granted to the Commissioner by the regulation, Commissioner Daines noted that because vaccine supplies are inadequate, he is suspending the mandatory requirement for health care worker vaccination. With vaccine supplies coming in at lower amounts and at a slower pace of delivery than originally projected, not all workers would be able to get vaccinated before the November 30 deadline provided in the regulation.

The Commissioner referred to the clause in the regulation that states: “If the commissioner determines the vaccine supplies are not adequate given the numbers of personnel to be vaccinated or vaccine(s) are not reasonably available, the commissioner may suspend the requirements(s) to vaccinate and/or change the annual deadline for such vaccinations(s) …”

The priority groups to receive the H1N1 flu vaccine, as established by the CDC, are:

  • Pregnant women, who are experiencing four times the rate of hospitalization and six times the rate of death from H1N1 flu;
  • Children and young people ages 6 months through 24 years (infants under 6 months cannot be vaccinated);
  • People who live with or provide care for infants under six months of age;
  • People ages 25-64 years old who have medical conditions that put them at higher risk for flu-related complications (including cancer, blood disorders, chronic lung disease, asthma, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disorders, liver disorders, neurological disorders, neuromuscular disorders, and weakened immune systems); and
  • Health care workers and emergency medical services personnel.

Dr. Daines noted that the CDC reported 43 pediatric deaths from the flu during September – an unusually high number. “I urge parents to get their children vaccinated and to take their children for treatment if they develop fever and breathing difficulties so that antiviral medication can be administered right away,” said Dr. Daines.

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Are vaccinations required for students?

Note: Although Governor David Paterson has temporarily suspended the mandatory vaccination program for New York State, we continue to strongly encourage employees and students to get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families, and our patients. Also note that some clinical sites may still require that you be vaccinated for either the seasonal flu, H1N1 (Swine) Flu, or both. If the site requires you to be vaccinated, you must be vaccinated prior to that clerkship beginning. For further information, see above.

On October 22, 2009, Governor David Paterson suspended the requirement that medical students and hospital employees be vaccinated. We are unsure if or when the requirement will be reinstated. We continue to strongly encourage employees and students to get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families, and our patients.

You should also note that some of our affiliated clinical sites may still require that you be vaccinated for either the seasonal flu, H1N1 (Swine) Flu, or both. If the site requires you to be vaccinated, you must be vaccinated prior to that clerkship or clinical experience beginning. For further information, see above.

The following is adapted text from several memorandums to all students regarding the Flu Vaccination program.

Requirements for:

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All Students Enrolled the Colleges of Medicine, Nursing or Health Related Professions & All Students Living in SUNY Downstate Residence Halls (irrespective of college or visitor status)

Requirement: On October 22, 2009, Governor David Paterson suspended the requirement that medical students and hospital employees be vaccinated. We are unsure if or when the requirement will be reinstated. We continue to strongly encourage employees and students to get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families, and our patients.

You should also note that some of our affiliated clinical sites may still require that you be vaccinated for either the seasonal flu, H1N1 (Swine) Flu, or both. If the site requires you to be vaccinated, you must be vaccinated prior to that clerkship or clinical experience beginning. For further information, see above.

Vaccine Administration: Shortly, you will receive instructions about how you may obtain your two flu vaccinations (seasonal flu and H1N1) at SUNY Downstate. You need to check your e-mail each day and make sure you are not “over quota” so you may receive these instructions promptly.

Documentation: If you already work for another healthcare facility or agency, or if you prefer to receive your vaccine "off-site" -- for example, at a drug store, at your private doctor's office, or at a clinical site, you will need to submit documentation to our Student Health Service. The documentation can be faxed to the Student Health Service at 718-270-2477 (a secure fax), mailed to Box 33, or hand-delivered to 440 Lenox Road, Apartment 1-S. Please indicate STUDENT on the document.

The information needed is:

  • Name of vaccine recipient
  • Date of Birth
  • Last 8 digits of Downstate ID card, if known
  • Type of vaccine (Influenza or H1N1)
  • Manufacturer
  • Lot number
  • Expiration Date
  • Date of vaccination
  • Dose given
  • Name and title of person administering the vaccine

This information is generally available on the flu consent form, and you should insist on a copy of the consent form at the time of vaccination. Also, KEEP A PHOTOCOPY OF THE FLU CONSENT FORM FOR YOUR RECORDS as you may need to show it to a clinical site. Despite the suspension of the New York State requirement, you should continue to submit this proof.

Consequences: On October 22, 2009, Governor David Paterson suspended the requirement that medical students and hospital employees be vaccinated. We are unsure if or when the requirement will be reinstated. We continue to strongly encourage employees and students to get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families, and our patients.

You should also note that some of our affiliated clinical sites may still require that you be vaccinated for either the seasonal flu, H1N1 (Swine) Flu, or both. If the site requires you to be vaccinated, you must be vaccinated prior to that clerkship or clinical experience beginning or you will be removed from your clinical site and/or will not be able to participate in clinical activities at that site. If that happens, we may not be able to find another site for you. For further information on the suspension of the requirement, see above.

If You Become Ill: If you become ill with flu-like symptoms (How do I know if I have the flu?), in addition to notifying your course or clinical faculty member, you need to notify Student Health by telephoning (718) 270-1995 or sending an e-mail to studenthealth@downstate.edu as we will be monitoring the number of cases which may be on campus.


All Students Enrolled in the School of Graduate Studies and the School of Public Health

Since students in these two schools do not necessarily have direct contact with patients, in their student role, it has been determined that they are not required take the flu vaccine by November 30. However, if you are a health care worker at another facility or agency, or are otherwise included by the regulation, you are required to comply with the regulation. School of Public Health students who have patient contact within the context of their required field experience or other course work are required to comply with the regulation.

SUNY Downstate residence hall: If you live in the residence hall, you are required to comply with the regulation and obtain the flu vaccine by November 30 since, if were ill, you could infect patients or staff who do have direct patient contact. See the sections on page one for a description of how to obtain the vaccine or submit documentation.

If You Become Ill: If you become ill with flu-like symptoms (How do I know if I have the flu? - http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/sick.htm), in addition to notifying your course or clinical faculty member, you need to notify Student Health by telephoning (718) 270-1995 or sending an email to studenthealth@downstate.edu as we will be monitoring the number of cases which may be on campus.

Vaccine administration: Students in the Schools of Graduate Studies and Public Health who wish to be vaccinated, but who are not covered by the New York State flu vaccination mandate, may schedule an appointment now, with their private physician obtain the vaccination.

At a future date, you will receive instructions about how you may obtain your two flu vaccinations (seasonal flu and H1N1) at SUNY Downstate, once the mandatory groups have been vaccinated. You need to check your email regularly and make sure you are not “over quota” so you may receive these instructions promptly.

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I have heard that a judge has temporarily suspended the New York State Department of Health Regulations requiring vaccinations. Do I still have to be vaccinated?

Note: After this court announcement, and unrelated to this decision, Governor David Paterson has temporarily suspended the mandatory vaccination program for New York State. We continue to strongly encourage employees and students to get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families, and our patients. Also note that some clinical sites may still require that you be vaccinated for either the seasonal flu, H1N1 (Swine) Flu, or both. If the site requires you to be vaccinated, you must be vaccinated prior to that clerkship beginning. For further information, see above.

The following memo was issued on October 21, 2009 by Dr. Michael Lucchesi, Chief Medical Officer of Downstate Medical Center:

On Friday, October 16, it was announced that a judge has temporarily suspended the New York State Department of Health Emergency Regulations mandating hospital personnel be vaccinated for influenza.

This means that at this time, hospital employees (and students) in New York State are not required to be vaccinated for either the seasonal or H1N1 (swine flu) forms of influenza. Nonetheless, we are very concerned about the prevalence of influenza this flu season, particularly H1N1, which is already circulating in the region and which dramatically increased visits to University Hospital’s Emergency Department earlier this year.

Accordingly, while this legal challenge is being resolved, we will continue our vaccination program on a voluntary basis, offering seasonal influenza vaccinations and, when supplies become available, also H1N1 vaccination to those who wish to receive it. Employees can stop by the Employee and Student Health Center now to get a seasonal flu shot; once our supply of H1N1 vaccine is in, we will announce times and dates for "Flu Fairs."

Those of us working in health care have a special responsibility to do all that we can to protect the health of our patients. And maintaining our own health is an important part of ensuring that we provide the best possible care for people who come to us when they are ill or injured, as well as protecting ourselves and our family members. We encourage every employee who has patient contact, and those who interact regularly with patient caregivers, to carefully consider the importance of being vaccinated.

We do not know how the lawsuit will be resolved and what the outcome of this challenge will be, but SUNY Downstate remains committed to promoting vaccination for the well-being of the community and patients we serve.

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I am in the required vaccination group. What will happen if I refuse to be vaccinated?

On October 22, 2009, Governor David Paterson suspended the requirement that medical students and hospital employees be vaccinated. We are unsure if or when the requirement will be reinstated. We continue to strongly encourage employees and students to get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families, and our patients.

You should also note that some of our affiliated clinical sites may still require that you be vaccinated for either the seasonal flu, H1N1 (Swine) Flu, or both. If the site requires you to be vaccinated, you must be vaccinated prior to that clerkship or clinical experience beginning or you will be removed from your clinical site and/or will not be able to participate in clinical activities at that site. If that happens, we may not be able to find another site for you.

For further information on the suspension of the requirement, see above.

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My family members live with me. Can they receive a vaccine at Downstate?

At this time, only regular matriculated Downstate students, employees, and others in the groups originally identified as being required by the New York State Department of Health's August 13, 2009 regulation will be permitted to receive a vaccine from Student & Employee Health. Others must obtain a vaccination from their private physician or another provider. For information on how to find a local vaccination clinic in New York City, see below.

Please note that it is recommended that family members who live in the SUNY Downstate Residence Halls obtain a vaccination and must do so using by going to their private physician or going to a local vaccination clinic. If you obtain the vaccine, be sure to obtain the documentation required as detailed above.

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I am a visiting student. Can I receive a vaccine at Downstate?

At this time, only regular matriculated Downstate students, employees, and others in the groups originally identified as being required by the New York State Department of Health's August 13, 2009 regulation will be permitted to receive a vaccine from Student & Employee Health. Others must obtain a vaccination from their private physician or another provider. For information on how to find a local vaccination clinic in New York City, see below.

Please note that it is recommended that visiting students obtain a vaccination and should do so by going to their private physician or going to a local vaccination clinic. Be sure to obtain the documentation required as detailed below.

Note: Although Governor David Paterson has temporarily suspended the mandatory vaccination program for New York State, we continue to strongly encourage employees and students to get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families, and our patients. For further information, see above.

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Where else can I obtain a vaccination?

If you wish to obtain a vaccination earlier than it is available from SUNY Downstate, or you are not in the group that can obtain it at Downstate, you can get a vaccination from your private physician or you can find out where to get vaccinations locally from the New York City Department of Health by clicking http://www.nyc.gov/html/doh/flu/html/home/home.shtml.

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I obtained my vaccination somewhere else. What documentation do I need to provide?

SUNY Downstate is required by New York State to report vaccinations of all students regardless if they were vaccinated here or elsewhere.

If you already work for another healthcare facility or agency, or if you prefer to receive your vaccine "off-site" -- for example, at a drug store, at your private doctor's office, or at a clinical site, you will need to submit documentation to our Student Health Service. The documentation can be faxed to the Student Health Service at 718-270-2477 (a secure fax), mailed to Box 33, or hand-delivered to 440 Lenox Road, Apartment 1-S. Please indicate STUDENT on the document.

The information needed is:

  • Name of vaccine recipient
  • Date of Birth
  • Last 8 digits of Downstate ID card, if known
  • Type of vaccine (Influenza or H1N1)
  • Manufacturer
  • Lot number
  • Expiration Date
  • Date of vaccination
  • Dose given
  • Name and title of person administering the vaccine

This information is generally available on the flu consent form, and you should insist on a copy of the consent form at the time of vaccination. Also, KEEP A PHOTOCOPY OF THE FLU CONSENT FORM FOR YOUR RECORDS as you may need to show it to a clinical site.

Note: Even though the original Department of Health regulation has been suspended, if you have received your vaccination at another facility, you should still report it using the instructions in this section.

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Where else can I obtain information?

Additional Resources:

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